I'm, just pottering about with a webiste for a client specilising in windows, doors and conservatories. Theyre based in north wales, near Chester and Wrexham.

They also operate in  Liverpool, Anglesey, Wirral, West Kirby and Mold

Artisan Conservatories, Windows & Doors, now in its 18th year,  is a family business which has been satisfying customers in the North Wales, Wirral, Chester & the Cheshire areas.

Takle a look if you might be interested in the folowing:

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Six great tips for split testing

Posted on February 22, 2011 14:19 by blything
Split testing shouldn’t be a mystery to any marketer looking to make a difference. Simply put, split tests allow digital marketers to fine tune and improve conversion rates. They do that by testing two versions of a thing (page, subject line, form, whatever) against each other and measuring the results.
 
A subject line is a great example – getting it right can mean the difference between poor and fantastic results.
 
Another example might be the humble “add to basket button”. If there’s a reason that Amazon are the kings of ecommerce, it’s because they split test. Their (not so little) yellow button has been split tested to the n’th degree, like everything else you see on amazon.com.
 
So how do you do it?
 
Here are six tips to get you started:
 
1. Conversion goals. Know them. If you’re not absolutely crystal clear on what constitutes a conversion, you’re wasting your time split testing. If you want people to get in touch, it will be your contact forms. If you want people to download your report, it will be the download link or thank you page. Get to know these goals and the paths your website visitors or email subscribers use to get there.
 
2. Write your split test list. You’re looking for anything that, with an improvement, will result in more conversions. Buttons and links, forms, layouts, copy – if I have to interact with it in order to get to your conversion goal, it’s fair game.
 
3. Think like a user. Consider each of the elements on your test list and how they might affect the user journey. Are any of them blocking or frustrating your users? Are they obvious enough? Or too distracting? Are you asking too much of the user? Or failing to excite them?
 
4. Hypothesise before testing. Eg. “I wonder if some users aren’t finding this button - If this button were bigger, it would be more obvious and would enable more users to click through to conversion. When you’re clear about the hypothesis, test only that one factor – in this instance, button size. If you test any more than one variable at once, you won’t be able to trust the results. If you want to test button colour, or position, that’s another test.
 
5. Measure and understand. The end result of any split test is a set of results. If you did it well, it should be as simple as two numbers. Clicks for version A against Clicks for version B. If the difference is significant, you know what to do.
 
6. Rinse and repeat . Split testing is a habit, it doesn’t stop.

The great thing with split testing is that you can do as little or as much as you want. If it’s a subject line for an email campaign, that’s easy to test, with big rewards. However you approach it, remember that every tiny increase in conversion ratio is persistent and cumulative. Doubling your conversion ratio is effectively the same as doubling your traffic.
 
This article also published here: Six great tips for split testing

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Almost everyone with a website wants to be number 1 in the search engines, which of course isn’t possible. That’s the point of search engines!
That’s also why Google make $24bn a year and are currently doubling that number every two years. Nice work if you can get it. I mean, that’s the sort of cash it takes to bail out a bank…
 
Whether you’re contributing to this figure by advertising with them or not, optimising your site to do better in the natural (non paid) search engine results pages is a good idea if you want to succeed / grow / do more of what you do.
 
Here are six things you can do today.
 

1.       Sort out your Keyword List

Probably the most important thing you need to do.  It’s easy to put this off and start tinkering straight away before you research but lets be clear about that – if you don’t know what your high value keywords are, what is it that you’re optimising?...
 
 
2.       Get analytics.
If you don’t measure, how will you know if you’re doing any good? Or bad for that matter…
Go here: http://www.google.com/analytics/ and create a Google Analytics account. Add the <code snip> to your site or get your web guy to do it.
Already got analytics in place? Use it!
 
Obviously it’s nice to know whether your traffic is trending up or down, but you need to get intimate with the reports! For the sake of a couple of hours spent learning your way around analytics, you will be rewarded with detailed knowledge of your market -  who uses your website*, how they use it and how they found it.
 
Use the data to fine tune your keywords list. Sometimes, you will see users finding you with unexpected keywords – pay attention! – that could be a market knocking on your door.
 
 
3.       Put some time in the diary.
This may sound blatantly obvious but it’s one of the main reasons why most people attempting to optimise a site fail to get anywhere.
How important is improving search engine performance to you?
How much time can you afford to put aside? One or two hours a week? A month?
Put it in the diary and stick to it.
 
 
4.       Build Links.
Without doubt, the number and quality of inbound links (Links To your site FROM another site) is one of the most influential factors affecting your ranking. Not all links are equal, however. It’s much better to have links from sites which themselves have plenty of good quality inbound links. One of the reasons that search engines, (Google in particular) place so much emphasis on this is that it’s so difficult to fake. There are plenty of ways to go about building links but the most important place to start is creating content which is worth linking to. Which leads nicely into...
 
 
5.       Create great content & add your keywords to it.
The majority of websites which languish in obscurity are often short of interesting and original content. Take a cold, dispassionate look at your site and ask yourself this: “If I were in charge of organising the entire world’s information, where would I rank it?”. If your content doesn’t measure up, neither will your rank so make sure you have great content.
 
 
6.       Get some help.
You don’t have to hire an external SEO consultant but if you decide not to, you still need some help. Whether it’s a colleague in sales, a friend at a newspaper or a friendly blogger, outside influencers are important and even a light touch from someone else can be just the help you need.
 
 
7.       Learn and be curious.
There are plenty of good resources around – this is the internet after all. Search Engine Optimisation is a very, very big subject so be prepared if you decide to manage it all yourself.

Search marketing is a big subject but it’s a powerful and interesting one. Each of these tips is something you can begin to influence practically today. What are you waiting for!
 
·         Yes, this is possible.
Article also punlished here: Seven SEO tactics you can use today

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Ten social meeja peeves

Posted on December 23, 2010 10:59 by blything

Overshare
We all know someone who does it, we may even be guilty occasionally. You know, that little bit of personal information that seemed like a good tweet at the time? Well,  there's a fine line between social media personality and over-sharing and if you're audience wince when they read about your poop a scoop experience, chances are they would have preferred not to have read about it.

Spam, spam, spam
Social media allows marketers to push messages and, well, marketers like to... push their message! All good marketers understand the value of repetition and let's face it, this isn't print or display.  Unit cost? Schmost.

OMG ZOMG
Ok, so if you're either a 16 year old digital native or you learned how to use facebook from a teenager, it's possible the odd ZOMG might creep into parlance. If you're addressing a business audience though, be careful as your ROFL may quickly become FOAD.

Shameless self promotion
Self promotion is almost written into the terms and conditions of social media, isn't it? That's sort of the point, in a way. After all, how can you update your status or tweet without self promotion of one form or another? Still, there is a line, and if you're crossing it, you're in danger of becoming the @misskatieprice of your industry neighbourhood.

Facebook, foursquare, Twitter, it's all the same to me
Twitter is not facebook and neither of them is foursquare. They all do different things and treating them all the same just won't do. Ok, setting Twitter to post status to #FB and LinkedIn is one thing but shouting on 4SQ like it's Twitter only shows that you don't know what you're doing.

Tag paperazzi
You've heard of munchhausens syndrome by proxy but tag paperazzi is more like overshare by proxy. Tag paperazzi think nothing of tagging you in photos, whether you like it or not. Could be a bad photo, could be you on a wild night the day you called in sick. They don't care.

Negative nancy
They say the first rule of communications is keep the message positive. Unfortunately a facebook account doesn't come with media training. Feel like venting your spleen at that special someone? Resist the urge.

The blurt window
Nobody has time to spare these days, but 10 tweets in 60 seconds, once a day? Really?

I'm not here, I'll ignore your message after the beep
You know the scenario, there's a facebook profile, linkedin, Twitter, but nobody monitors them. Never a great customer experience, being ignored. Social media is for life (at least the life of your current marketing plan), not just for Christmas.

Do you want to know more about Social Media Marketing?

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Email Marketing - Do's and Don'ts

Posted on August 15, 2010 17:56 by blything

Like it or not, Email marketing is here to stay. As a digital marketing agency, it’s our business to stay up to speed with developments but for many, it’s a minefield. How many ugly, non-functional, broken mass emails do you see every week? I get hundreds and I’m talking local organisations, not the Viagra crowd here.
So what can you do to avoid being an email numpty and contributing to this inbox litter?

Here are a few tips to get you started:

Do Test Your Email. Just because it looks OK to you doesn’t mean it looks OK to anybody else. There are scores of email programs and each will display your email differently. Outlook (2003 onwards) blocks all images by default. What do you mean that your key message was in a graphic?! Maybe that’s why nobody clicked..

Do offer an unsubscribe link. You’re obliged to by law.

Do use a good quality list and treat the recipients as people. You’ll do far better building relationships than talking at people. Your recipients are all potential advocates of your brand and it’s your job to build the relationship to the point where they become just that.

Do think about presentation. Presentation counts for a great deal and you’re out to impress. What will your market think when they receive ugly, off brand, broken or inaccessible communications from you?

Do include a call to action. It’s easy to forget or shy away from but it will increase your response rates and recipients value directness – it saves time and precious attention.

Do consider using a professional service. It’s not appropriate for everybody – the communication might not be that important or you may just be getting started. At some point though, you will be communicating to the most important people in your business – customers. Amateurish communications stand out and they will judge you accordingly.

Do keep it short and simple. Bear in mind the environment you’re operating in. The inbox is best suited to short communications. If you give away the whole story, what reason does your reader have for taking further action? Often it’s better to use a short paragraph and stop partway to engage the curiosity of your… [More]

Do Spellcheck. It san obveyus one but freequently overloked. Get at least one other person to proof your copy as a minimum. This helps to avoid “Copy Blindness” – when you have written something yourself, it’s impossible to see it with fresh eyes.

Don’t let convenience make you sloppy. It’s very, very easy to CC a big list with a pointless or counterproductive communication. It’s easy and convenient to cut your own hair too..

Don’t put your list in the CC field. Ever! If you absolutely must use a mail client like Outlook to send mass email, rather than professional email broadcast software, use the BCC field. If you do use the CC list, you are on questionable legal ground as you will infringe the privacy rights of everybody on your list by effectively giving the list to all of the recipients. Some of the worst scenarios I’ve seen involving mass email come down to this schoolboy error. I remember one company where a supplier hit “reply all” and took the opportunity to tell the entire list that the company didn’t pay their bills and that their product could be bought at lower cost elsewhere!

Don’t get blacklisted. If you’re using your own email account (rather than a professional) to manage your email broadcasts, you’re basically sending bulk email through your ISP’s mailserver - they only provide that to you for conventional email use. Fall foul of enough spam filters or complaints and both your email address and the IP address of the server are at risk from blacklisting. Not good..

Don’t Spam. It’s not worth it. Everybody on your list should have given you their permission. In B2B mailing, that could mean having given you a business card, but beware – consumers are better protected.

Don’t worry too much about timing. At least not to the point where it prevents you from acting, anyway. Sure time of day is important but not as important as getting great content out to a responsive list. If you send on a Sunday night, your email may get lost in the Monday morning deluge. If you send on a Friday afternoon, you may get more attention for light-hearted content as people wind down. Tuesday lunchtimes are regarded as a good time for maximising response rate.

Don’t “Fire and Forget”. Broadcast software is fairly advanced and affordable now and can provide very accurate tracking, not just of bounces and successful deliveries but links clicked. Every email you send should be giving you a snapshot of what people are interested in Right This Minute.

Glow is a digital agency specialising in Email Marketing Liverpool. Get in touch

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Pest Control Jobs

Posted on July 21, 2010 18:31 by blything
Just been tweaking the Pest Control Jobs where there are jobs in pest control.

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Just finished the latest 60 really useful minutes for Liverpool Chamber of Commerce on the wonderful subject of Getting the most of Twitter for Business.

Pleasantly surprised to see the room packed and not enough seats :) 

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Viral Marketing for Liverpool clients

Posted on December 2, 2009 17:05 by blything
Just added a page to our services about the viral marketing projects we do for our liverpool clients.

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Logo Design and Branding

Posted on November 30, 2009 17:10 by blything

Was just looking back over our past work and we seem to have done a few Logo Designs and branding  projects.

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Printed Cable Ties

Posted on August 10, 2009 12:11 by blything

Random bit of S E O Nonsense - move along now, nothing for you to see here ;)

Printed Cable Ties are great things aren't they? You can print on them and then tie things with them. I love printed cable ties.

Printed cable ties. 

There are also some Cleaning supplies, cleaning equipment and cleaning products here. Mainly though, its about Pest Control Jobs.

Lovely. 

 

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